Friday, 20 May 2011

Reform

The idea that we are governed by anyone other than elected representatives is quite frankly abhorrent. Isn’t it time that the UK became something a bit nearer a democracy?

The referendum on AV was a disappointment. Whilst the British public seem to have little or no interest in reform of the voting system, or of the House of Lords, it doesn’t mean that it is not important, and it doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t have a significantly positive effect on people’s lives. I happen to subscribe to the belief that a good society is an equal society. That with a narrowing of the gap between rich and poor, society will become a generally happier collective. A more equal society brings with it better health, a better educated population and less crime. By limiting extremes of wealth and poverty you could achieve so much more than any investment in the NHS, schools or the police force could ever do. But in order to attain this political nirvana we must first change the mind-set of the country. Turkeys would indeed vote for Christmas if they had been conditioned into thinking it was a good thing. The structure of society and the foundations it is built upon need to offer equality in opportunity and to be seen to be equal handed in all its dealings. Part of engendering equality in society at large is to have fairness and equality in the way we are governed. Whilst we have privilege, an unelected upper house and a monarchy we can never even consider calling ourselves a democracy.

Short term reform won’t put bread on the table but slightly longer term it will and it’ll be a crusty granary loaf for all!





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